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Top 10 OSHA Violations in 2018

OSHA recently unveiled its top 10 most frequently cited standards. The agency reports the leading causes of workplace injuries during its fiscal year (October through the following September) to help businesses identify common safety pain points.

Here’s the list of the top 10 violations in 2018:

1. Fall protection: 7,270 citations—Falls from ladders and roofs still account for the majority of injuries at work, and the first step in eliminating or reducing falls is to identify all hazards and decide how to best protect employees.

2. Hazard communication: 4,552 citations—This standard governs hazard communication to employees about chemicals that are both produced or imported into the workplace. Most violations concern the failure to develop a written hazard training program or failure to provide a Safety Data Sheet for all workplace chemicals.

3. Scaffolding: 3,336 citations—The vast majority of scaffold accidents can be attributed to planking or support giving way. Employers should ensure that all scaffolding is set up and inspected by a qualified employee before it’s used.

4. Respiratory protection: 3,118 citations—Employers must establish and maintain a respiratory inspection program to protect employees from oxygen-deficient atmospheres and hazardous materials.

5. Lockout/tagout: 2,994 citations—Employees who service mechanical and electrical equipment face the greatest risk of injury if lockout/tagout standards aren’t properly followed.

6. Ladders: 2,812 citations—Most ladder violations occur when ladders are used for purposes other than those designated by the manufacturer, when they aren’t used on stable surfaces or when defective ladders aren’t taken out of service.

7. Powered industrial trucks: 2,294 citations—Many employees are injured when lift trucks or forklifts are driven off of loading docks or when they fall between docks and unsecured trailers.

8. Fall protection training requirements: 1,982 citations—Employees should be trained to use fall protection methods such as guardrails, safety nets and personal fall arrest systems, and employers should verify that employees have been trained by preparing written certification records.

9. Machine guarding: 1,972 citations—Machine parts can cause serious injuries, but the risk is substantially reduced by installing and maintaining proper machine guards.

10. Eye and face protection: 1,536 citations—Safety goggles, masks and other equipment can help prevent eye injuries, which cost employers an estimated $300 million every year in lost production time, medical expenses and workers’ compensation claims.

Filed under: OSHA,Safety — Jillian Bender-Cormier @ 5:16 pm January 7, 2019


Introducing ALICE (Active Shooter Defense) Training at Warren G. Bender Co.

OVER 80% OF ACTIVE SHOOTER INCIDENTS OCCUR AT WORK
According to the FBI, 160 active shooter incidents occurred in the United States between 2000 and 2013. Over 80 percent (132) of those incidents occurred at a place of work.

WE TAKE SAFETY TRAINING TO THE NEXT LEVEL FOR OUR CLIENTS
Warren G. Bender Co. has invested in specific training for you and your team called ALICE (Alert, Lockdown, Inform, Counter, Evacuate). This training provides preparation and a plan for individuals and organizations on how to proactively handle the threat of an aggressive intruder or active shooter event. Whether it is an attack by an individual person or by an international group of professionals intent on conveying a political message through violence, ALICE Training option-based tactics have become the accepted response, versus the traditional “lockdown only” approach.

ENROLL IN OUR TRAINING TODAY
Protection and safety must be the priority in an Active Shooter event or Terrorist Attack. Circumstantial and operational concerns vary in every new situation. ALICE Training provides options that address the unique challenges specific to your business. We’re offering this training at a 40% discount at $9 per employee.

OPT TO BE PREPARED FOR THIS EVER-GROWING THREAT TO OUR BUSINESSES AND FAMILIES
Don’t be in denial that your place of work and the people within it are exempt from an active shooter occurrence. Take advantage of the WGBCO ALICE training and show your team that you take their safety seriously.

CONTACT JACKIE SUDIA TO GET STARTED
916-380-5333 (direct)
jsudia@wgbender.com
Cost: $9 per employee (40% off)

Filed under: Recent Headlines,Safety — Jillian Bender-Cormier @ 12:54 am November 7, 2017


Do Office Employees Need Training for GHS (Globally Harmonized System of Identification of Hazardous Substances)?

Back in 2013, employers were advised of the requirement to train employees regarding new label elements and safety data sheets but there have been questions about why some employees would need to be trained. For example, an office employee cleans their desk surface weekly with a cleaning product purchased by the employer from a grocery store and is available for employee use. Is GHS training required for that employee?

The Technical Answer
California Code of Regulations 5194(b)(5)(G) excludes incidental use as follows:
(G) Consumer products packaged for distribution to, and use by, the general public, provided that employee exposure to the product is not significantly greater than the consumer exposure occurring during the principal consumer use of the product; GHS training is required for employees working with hazardous substances on a regular basis in the course and scope of their employment.

The Practical Answer
GHS Training is not required for incidental use of a consumer product used in a consumer manner but general awareness training for all employees of the hazardous material identification system would be considered wise and a ‘best practice’ for all employers. Why? Because in the event of an injury to an employee caused by substances in the workplace, it could be deemed negligent that an employer provided a product but not information of its hazardous nature. Free information and GHS training materials are readily available from many sources, see below.

Still unsure of whether to train? Call OSHA Compliance 916-263-0704. I reached a knowledgeable person on my first try and/or call your insurance agent/broker for information.

Resources
California Code of Regulations-Hazard Communication https://www.dir.ca.gov/title8/5194.html
Cal OSHA Safety and Health Fact Sheet on GHS-Globally Harmonized System-DIR http://www.dir.ca.gov/dosh/dosh_publications/ghs_fs.pdf
Guide to the California Hazard Communication Regulation-DIR https://www.dir.ca.gov/dosh/dosh_publications/hazcom.pdf
US Department of Labor –OSHA Hazard Communication https://www.osha.gov/dsg/hazcom/index.html
Free PowerPoint presentation http://www.osha.gov/SLTC/hazardcommunications/ghsoverview.ppt
Free YouTube Training Video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PkGbof7FeZA
Sacramento Safety Center http://safetycenter.org/

If you have any questions or comments, please do not hesitate to contact me.

Jackie Sudia-Reno, AIC, ARM, CRIS
Claims and Risk Management Liaison
Warren G. Bender Co.
License #0406967
jsudia@wgbender.com
(916)380-5333 (Direct Phone & Fax)
(916)960-6957 (Mobile/Text)

Filed under: OSHA,Property & Casualty,Safety — Jillian Bender-Cormier @ 1:29 pm March 30, 2016


Contractor Safety: Are You Responsible When They Are on Site?

Dealing with contractors on site who don’t adhere to your safety procedures can be risky. Since you or your employer can be subject to fines or even jail time when not compliant with regulations, you need to know who is accountable for your contractors.

Countries have different rules and regulations when it comes to safety and training for contracted companies and lone workers.

Globally, the International Labour Organization (ILO) reports that “although there are no ILO instruments that specifically address contractors’ and subcontractors’ safety and health at work (or for training in the industry), those concerning occupational safety and health (OSH) in general emphasize the importance of OSH training for all workers. Safety training should focus on supporting preventive action and finding practical solutions.”

While there are no specific global requirements, we will explore contractor safety regulations for the construction industry in the United States.

United States
OSHA offers safety and health regulations for construction. According to the regulations for construction, “in no case shall the prime contractor be relieved of overall responsibility for compliance with the requirements of this part for all work to be performed under the contract.”

Workers in the engineering and construction industries face many hazards, as construction sites are one of the most dangerous places to work in the world, especially for contracted lone workers.
OSHA also indicates that “to the extent that a subcontractor of any tier agrees to perform any part of the contract, he also assumes responsibility for complying with the standards in this part with respect to that part… [W]ith respect to subcontracted work, the prime contractor and any subcontractor or subcontractors shall be deemed to have joint responsibility.”

In 2013, OSHA noted that 20 percent of occupational fatalities were in construction. Every month, the agency reports fatalities of contract workers, and often, publicizes citations and fines for both host companies and the employers of contract employees if they are killed or injured or endangered on the job.

The Safety Landscape is Evolving: Are you Prepared?
In the United Kingdom and Australia, the governments have implemented legislation that requires the employers to be responsible for the safety and well being of their contractors. Canada and the United States still have some work to do so that contractor responsibility is clear for both employers and contractors.

Is your organization up-to-date on local and regional legislation? Is this information effectively communicated – specifically to your lone workers? And are your current safety investments compliant?

Filed under: Blog,Construction,Safety,Surety Monthly — Jillian Bender-Cormier @ 12:22 am November 25, 2015


Oh Rats! Surprising Risks You Should Know About the Drought

By: Jackie Sudia-Reno, AIC, ARM, CRIS, Claims & Risk Management Liaison, Warren G. Bender Co.

We’re all changing the way we do things due to the severe drought that our area is experiencing. Here is an example of an unexpected consequential hazard from the drought…

A large commercial building sustained water damage; the culprits are rats. The rats chewed holes in condensation water lines above the ceiling tiles of the building to get to the water inside. When the hot weather hit and the condensation flow increased for several days running, the water escaped through the holes in the lines and caused major damage to the ceiling, walls, and flooring which produced mold growth quite quickly into the warm air. (more…)

Filed under: Property & Casualty,Safety — Jillian Bender-Cormier @ 6:17 pm June 25, 2015